Questions to Ask Yourself If You’re Thinking About Becoming an ESL Teacher Each and every day, people immigrate to English speaking countries from nations around the globe. Some of these individuals are seeking refuge from war or oppression, while others simply want to create a better life for their children and for future generations of their families. One thing that all sorts of foreign immigrants have in common, though, is that they generally do not speak English fluently. Since this is the case, English as a second language classes have enjoyed a surge in registration. These classes are most commonly referred to as ESL courses. If you have been thinking about becoming an English as a second language teacher, there are several issues you need to consider first. You’ll learn more about these as you read the rest of this guide. What Sort of ESL Program Appeals Most to Me?
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You must grasp the fact that there are quite a few types of English as a second language programs. It’s quite possible that particular options will be more up your alley than others will be. If, for instance, you happen to have been raised in a house where English was not the first language, and a relative, close friend, or schoolteacher taught you to be fluent as a child, it might be important to you to only assist those students whose mother tongue is identical to yours. If this is your desire, make a point of only considering those ESL programs that put students into classes based upon their native languages.
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If, on the other hand, you are a native English speaker with a rudimentary grasp of several foreign languages, you may want to consider teaching in a full-immersion English as a second language program. In courses that fall into this category, instructors only speak English from the first day until the last. Students even begin to create sentences that include basic subjects and verbs almost immediately. How Can I Determine Which Curriculum Aligns With My Teaching Style? Certain ESL programs ask that their instructors use very specific curriculum to teach by, while others allow teachers to decide which option they like best. If you are allowed to choose a curriculum that speaks to you, you won’t be disappointed in how many options you have. As you evaluate the pros and cons of the ESL books on your shortlist, ponder how you intend to teach your students. It might, for instance, be a priority for their workbooks to give them a simple sentence examples list. Or, perhaps your biggest priority is knowing that your students will have to use words in a sentence every time they are in class. Generally, they will have new words to add to their English vocabularies every week.